Browsing Category

Finished Object

Finished Object Knitting

Gully : Pattern Review and FO

August 17, 2017
Gully Cowl: Pattern Review and FO

This week I’m excited to share a project of firsts with you. Gully is not only my first project with brioches lace, but my first project with Brooklyn Tweed’s new Vale lace weight yarn! I knit Gully as part of Brooklyn Tweed’s Summer of Lace Knit Along. It traveled with me to Minneapolis and back and I learned a lot about brioche along the way. One of my goals for this year was to get better at brioche and, while this pattern was a challenge, It was a good challenge and I’m delighted by how it turned out.

Gully Cowl: Pattern Review and FO

The Pattern

Gully is a small, brioche lace cowl that can be knit in less than on skein of Brooklyn Tweed’s Vale. This may have contributed to my decision to make it because I wanted to try Vale, but I’m on a budget, dangit! It produces a very light and lofty cowl, which is great, because sometimes bulky cowls in the winter make me want to strangle somebody. The loftyness is the result of the brioche stitch and it’s wonderful three dimensional texture and a very strong blocking. Seriously, this thing grew a LOT when I blocked it.

The pattern, like all Brooklyn Tweed patterns, is beautifully written. It is very clear in it’s instructions for the special techniques. The lace portion quickly becomes manageable after a little time of focus. I did have a bit of confusion on the top and botton ribbing of the cowl. The pattern said to repeat rows 1 and 2 14 times and I wasn’t sure if that meant 14 rows total or 28 rows total. I did 14, because I was impatient. I don’t think that was technically correct, but the cowl came out fine anyways.

The other thing that I would say about that pattern is that it does not make for good travel knitting. It is concentration knitting. It is not good “there was turbulence on the plane and crap I dropped a stitch” knitting. If you are prone to dropping stitches, a lifeline might be a good idea for this project, because dropped stitches in brioche suuuuuck. If you find that you have, in fact, dropped a stitch, I found this video to be particularly helpful:

Despite my travel struggles, I’m really happy with how this cowl turned out. Like all Brooklyn Tweed Patterns, it has the feel of an heirloom piece. It is classic, subtle and elegantly designed. Jared Flood is an elf among hobbits when it comes to design and it shows in Gully. I can’t wait for colder weather so I can wear it more often.

Gully Cowl: Pattern Review and FO

The Yarn

Gully was my first chance to try Brooklyn Tweed’s new Vale lace weight yarn. Vale prides itself on being 100% Rambouillet fleece, and Brooklyn Tweed’s softest yarn yet. The verdict? Vale is, in fact, soft. I can wear it close to my neck with no issues. That being said, it is still definitely a wooly yarn. It is a fairly smooth yarn and has a consistent texture, but it’s not really squishy smooshy soft. It’s like Knit Picks Pallete had an older sister who went to university and studied abroad and wears designer clothes. It’s refined, polished and effective at what it does. Still, you’re buying it for the color and consistency, not for the softness.

I can say that while this yarn feels super delicate, it can stand up to some decent abuse. Because brioche and planes don’t mix, I had to rip back this yarn…a few times (a lot). Some yarns tend to get a little frayed and fuzzy with this much frogging, but Vale handled it surprisingly well. So far, I’ve seen no pilling, and don’t think that I really will. This yarn was designed for “heirloom-quality lace projects,” and I firmly believe that it will stand up to that description. 

I would absolutely use Vale again. I love it’s range of colors, it’s warm and earthy feel and it’s polished finished appearance. While I don’t see myself taking any major lace projects on anytime soon, when I do, I know that I can rely on Vale to provide a consistent, easy to work with yarn.

 

Finished Object Knitting Lifestyle

Tegna Sweater : Pattern Review

July 13, 2017

Summer knitting is coming along nicely. How is everyone else doing with their projects? The first of two summer Knitalongs that I decided to participate in was the Tegna Sweater KAL with Caitlin Hunter (@boylandknitworks). KAL #2(The Summer of Lace KAL with Brooklyn Tweed) is currently kicking my butt, so we’re not going to talk about it…

Tegna Sweater

The Pattern

Tegna is a short, slightly dolman sleeved, cropped sweater with a lacy hem. The pattern itself is delightfully easy and totally manageable for a short summer knit. It’s knit up in a fingering weight yarn, which creates a very versatile weight. I often find that the worsted and bulky weight sweaters that fly off my needles never get work in the Texas heat. Fingers crossed that this fingering weight sweater can get a little bit more use!

Tegna Sweater

The focal feature of Tegna is the lace section along the hem. While is looks really difficult, I didn’t have a ton of trouble with it. You definitely have to keep track on your lace chart, because there’s not a lot of repeat from row to row. That being said, it’s pretty easy to read where the pattern is going. After the lace, the rest is  nothing but relaxing stockinette. For the neck hem, you have the option of binding off and picking up stitches, or placing neck stitches on a holder. I bound them off, but next time I think i would use a holder.

Tegna is really flexible when it comes to gauge. I used size 5 needles for most of it, but needle sizes can vary widely. I also made my Tegna pretty fitted, while other have done a more loose and drapey version. I love that the pattern can be so versatile and still look great! I would totally try knitting this again in a drapey linen or silk blend.

Tegna Sweater

The Yarn

I knit Tegna using 4 skeins of Quince and Co. Finch in the color Honey. I expected to use more than 4 skeins, so I preemptively ordered more, but I didn’t end up using them. Finch is a 100% wool fingering weight yarn. It is very consistent in texture and has great stitch definition. Some users have complained about pilling, but I haven’t noticed any issues so far. It did bleed a little bit of color in the wash, but otherwise I’ve had no issues with it. It’s an easy to knit with yarn and I enjoy the color palette.

The only issue I have with Quince and Co. is that their online stock doesn’t always update very quickly. If they run out of a color, it can be quite some time until they restock, which is why I was so skittish about running out of yarn. Despite this, I would use the yarn again, and would love to try out some different colors. I am in love with this honey color though…

Tegna Sweater

I’m hoping I get a lot of wear out of this Tegna sweater. I was fun to watch everyone knit it on instagram and the same time and it’s even more fun to see how everyone is styling their completed project! Did you participate in the Tegna KAL? I’d love to see your finished product! Thinking about making a Tegna for yourself? I’d love to hear what yarn you’re using!

Finished Object Lifestyle Seasonal

DIY Crochet Yoga Strap

June 22, 2017
DIY Crochet Yoga Strap

Do you ever wake up with the attitude, “I’m going to be healthy today”? Like, you’re ready to work out and hydrate and eat healthy and use soap made out of goat’s milk and stuff. Last weekend we had one of those days. We woke up early-ish and proceeded to go to the McKinney Farmers Market in Chestnut Square. If you’re in the area and you’ve never been to the McKinney Farmers Market, you should go! It’s in a little old historical section of town among all these cute old buildings and a wedding chapel. It is also where The Hubs and I got engaged (Though not during the farmers market, that would have been way to much of an audience!).

DIY Crochet Yoga Strap 1

After a long morning at the Farmers Market, at which we bought some excellent okra, The Hubs and I went to check out the local Yoga Fest near our apartment. Admission was free if you registered in advance, so we figured that we would check it out. The registration specified, however, that you must bring your own yoga mat.

While The Hubs and I have our own yoga mats, they’ve never…umm…been to yoga. They sit in a basket looking healthy while we do yoga on the carpet. We’ve never taken a yoga class, thanks to youtube, so they never really seemed worth it. However, it seemed the we were going to have to take them for a spin at the Yoga Fest. That meant I had to think about how to carry them.

Enter the crochet yoga strap!

DIY Crochet Yoga Strap

There are several very helpful and quick patterns for crocheted yoga straps on Pinterest and Ravelry. I ended up using this one. I used a worsted weight yarn held double and each strap took me maybe 10 – 20 minutes total. I braided the ends of the yarn instead of weaving them in because I’m lazy and I hate finishing. I may add some more tassels and beads later on to spruce them up. Then I tried them on our mats and they worked beautifully!

I was afraid that the straps would slip off the yoga mats and be hard to use but they were great. I even got a few compliments on how clever they were, though that may have been because some women wanted to sell me some doTerra…

We didn’t end up staying a the Yoga Fest very long, but I have my eye on a few other yoga events in the future. There’s a yoga studio in downtown McKinney that offers free community yoga on Saturdays at Tupps Brewery. There’s also Saturday morning yoga available at Klyde Warren Park! I don’t know if I’ll have any more healthy feeling Saturdays up my sleeve, but if I do, I’ll be ready thanks to my new yoga strap!