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2017 Winter Reading List

December 14, 2017
2017 Winter Reading List

As the Christmas season approaches, I am forced to let go of Fall and acknowledge Winter. I always have a hard time with this because Fall comes late to Texas, and the leaves are just starting to turn by the beginning of December. But with winter comes the winter reading list! I’m keeping my winter reading list a little lighter and more flexible to account for the business of the holiday season. That being said. I recently got my new library card and I’m drunk with power, so who knows where I’ll end up!

Knitlandia

Knitlandia by Clara Parks

Knitlandia has been buzzed about in knitting circles quite a bit. I suppose we all like to hear about the world through our unique lens. Knitlandia is a memior by Clara Parks that discusses her most memorable travels throughout the world, but from the viewpoint of a knitter. Knitting has so many regional differences, that I’m anticipating a lot of interesting stories. I’m hoping that this book will inspire me when I’m lagging on my knitting projects. It will certainly make a good discussion topic at knit nights.

Murder for Christmas

Murder for Christmas by Francis Duncan

Murder for Christmas is described as “perfect for fans of Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot.” Well, that sounds like me, and a Christmas themes murder mystery sounded like fun. Mordecai Tremaine arrives at a party at the home of Benedict Grame, but finds that not everything is good cheer. When party goers discover a dead body among the presents beneath the tree, the mystery begins and Mordecai must sort it out before anyone else suffers the same terrible fate. 

Still Life

Still Life by Louise Penney

Sarah Bessey often talks about her love for Louise Penney and her Inspector Gamache books, and frankly, I trust her judgement. Still Life appears to be the first in a long line of Inspector Gamache novels. I’m excited by the idea of adding a new series to my To Read list. This one focuses of the surprising yet rather mundane death of Jane Neal. On the surface, it seems like a hunting accident, but could it be more sinister? Inspector Gamache thinks so. The fact that this book is impossible to get at the library and never goes on sale indicates to me that it’s probably a winner. 

Option B

Option B by Sheryl Sandburg

Since reading Lean In by Sheryl Sandburg shortly after my college graduation, I have been a fan of her writing. Much of Lean In talked about making your partner an equal partner in household labor so that women could rise to their fullest potential in the workplace. When Sheryl’s husband died suddenly and tragically, I wondered how it would effect her message. Option B is her response. Option B deals with Sheryl’s grief, but also her decision to find joy again. I expect this book to be full of wisdom and hard truths, but also grace an encouragement. I’m excited to finally read it.

All the Light We Cannot See

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See was recommend to me by my boss, who read it for a book club. She told me that it was excellent, so I’ve had my eye out for it ever since. It is a World War II novel that deals with a German boy and a blind French girl on opposite sides of a war that neither of them asked for. I have heard that it is incredibly well written, and so I have high expectations for it.

Heartless

Heartless by Marissa Meyer

Since I liked the Lunar Chronicles series by Marissa Meyer, Heartless seemed like the next logical progession. It’s a fairy tale retelling as well, but this time deals with the Queen of Hearts from Alice in Wonderland rather than a traditional fairy tale. It goes back to before the Queen of Hearts was queen, when she was just a young woman hoping to find her own way, make her own decisions, and fall in love with a person of her choosing. Somewhere along the way, it seems that something goes wrong to give us the brutal Queen of Hearts that we know today.

Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol is a traditional Christmas read for me, so it’s natural that it would appear on my winter reading list. Growing up, my family would watch a version of A Christmas Carol every year on Christmas Eve. (The best version is the one with Patrick Stewart and I will fight you on this!) Now that we’re adults, we don’t always watch it on Christmas Eve, but we do always watch it sometime during the Christmas season. Now that I’m grown, I’ve taken to reading it as well. Most of the movies are pretty accurate, but I find that the literary Scrooge is a little more sympathetic and complex.

Of Mess and Moxie

Of Mess and Moxie by Jen Hatmaker

I do appreciate a good Jen Hatmaker book, and Of Mess and Moxie is her latest. I find that she is down to earth, but totally earnest and convicting. She doesn’t ask you to do anything that she hasn’t already challenged herself about. Sometimes she gets a little distracted with silly stories, but I love her humor and storytelling style, so I’ll put up with it. I may read this one via audiobook, just to see if I come away with a different conclusion (and also because the audiobook is available through my library).

Station Eleven

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

Station Eleven was featured in one of Modern Mrs. Darcy’s blog posts as a book that she loved rereading. I was intrigued, since I consider rereading to be the mark of a good book. Station Eleven takes place in after the collapse of modern civilization as a result of disease. It include a travelling symphony/Shakespeare troupe, some unique comic books and the life and impact of an aging actor. Just that combinations of factors seems interesting to me, so I’m excited to see what it’s all about.

That’s all that’s on my winter reading list so far! I am looking for recommendations as well. I finally got a goodreads account in hopes of getting tailored recommendations, but I value a personal recommendation much more. What’s the best thing you’ve read this year?